theuppitynegras:

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

pokerwithplato:

boss-of-the-plains:

pokerwithplato:

boss-of-the-plains:

countdowncityconquistador:

brownglucose:

elegantly-tasteless:

20daysofjune:

brandyliquor:

baijara:

EFF IGGY (IGGY AZALEA DISS) 

https://twitter.com/whoismaddmary
https://www.facebook.com/whoismaddmary

http://soundcloud.com/ojtheproducer
https://twitter.com/OJTHEPRODUCER

YAAAAAAAASSSSSS

Bars…….

LMAOOOO YO WHO DIS?
SHE WENT OFF

Yass bitch go awwwfffffff

My mouth was open the entire time damnnnnnnn this shit is crazyyyyyyy

Nice

Waits for Tip’s response….

>Doesn’t like Iggy because she is white and sings hip hop shit

>”I ain’t racist”

Back the fuck up. Charley Pride was a black man who sang country and he was the shit. If someone told him to stop “appropriating” white people music, that certain someone would be outed as a racist because they are being fucking racist. Hip hop and other racket that I am not fond of is a part of American culture now and if a foreigner wants to come to my fucking country to take part in the culture and not dismantle the shit out of it, they are welcome to come here and be whatever they want to be. So fuck you.

And it is not appropriation of black music. Appropriation of something implies that its elements, once removed from their original contexts, can take on meanings that are significantly divergent from, or less nuanced than, those they originally held. It’s fucking music! It’s meant to be shared and enjoyed by all and if someone takes inspiration from a culture different than their own, then fuck you to tell them that what they are doing is wrong!

Um you do know that country music was started by black Slave folk and appropriated by white southerners right? Like the banjo, washboard etc were instruments used by slaves folk that they brought from their respective cultures or were household ornsments they used as instruments. There’s so many other things wrong with everything you said that I’m not sure if I should address. Like damn it’s too early for this fuckshit.

Actually, dumbass, country music is based upon traditional Irish folk music. Do your homework and fuck off.

African immigrants and their descendants did give America’s heartland music a range of musical style influences, one of its earliest dominant instruments—the banjo—its first recording using another of its dominant instruments—the steel guitar—and many of its earliest and subsequent practitioners, teachers and audience members.

Country music is often erroneously thought of as solely the creation of European Americans. However, a great deal of style—and of course, the banjo, a major instrument in most early American folk songs—came from African Americans. One of the reasons country music was created by African Americans, as well as European Americans, is because blacks and whites in rural communities in the south often worked and played together, just as recollected by DeFord Bailey[11] in the PBS documentary, DeFord Bailey: A Legend Lost.[12] Influential black guitarist Arnold Shultz, known as the primary source for thumb style, or Travis picking, played with white musicians in west-central Kentucky.

SMH….looks like you didn’t do your home work.

Whooooops

white people continue to make up music fact like this one doesn’t even make sense considering the Irish didn’t come here in large numbers until the 1900’s like that’s just right off the bat

Posting again…

Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens.
Jimi Hendrix  (via damnfuckshit)
gonola:

The summer concert series Wednesdays on the Point, will be happening again this year in Algiers Point from July 9 – August 27.  It all happens directly across the Mississippi River from the French Quarter in New Orleans’ second oldest neighborhood: Algiers Point, and it’s free, with food and drink for sale to help keep the weekly event free! Take the Algiers Ferry over and discover one of the most charming neighborhoods all while listening to some great live, local music! Our blog post on GoNOLA.com has all the details to set you on your adventure to the West Bank of New Orleans.

gonola:

The summer concert series Wednesdays on the Point, will be happening again this year in Algiers Point from July 9 – August 27.  It all happens directly across the Mississippi River from the French Quarter in New Orleans’ second oldest neighborhood: Algiers Point, and it’s free, with food and drink for sale to help keep the weekly event free! Take the Algiers Ferry over and discover one of the most charming neighborhoods all while listening to some great live, local music! Our blog post on GoNOLA.com has all the details to set you on your adventure to the West Bank of New Orleans.

medievalpoc:

rebornasacynic:

babefield:

cusscakes:

medievalpoc:

heartsalchemy:

medievalpoc:

Peter Lely

Portrait of Elizabeth Murray

England (c. 1650)

Oil on canvas, 124 x 119 cm

[x] [x] [x] [x]

I think I have seen pictures of this before, in high school maybe, but I don’t remember there being a second person before. I seem to remember this image being cropped differently too, which is very disturbing because now that I see the entire painting, the way I remember it being cropped was very clearly and deliberately intended to remove the person holding the tray of flowers.

Since we’re throwing haymakers at the kyriarchy today, I think this is something that we should really be talking about too, because it happens

ALL. THE. TIME.

Level 1: People of Color from Medieval, Renaissance, and other Early Modern European works were often literally painted over in later decades or centuries.

For example: In this painting, Giulia de’Medici (the child) was painted over in the 19th century:

image

Level 2: It was very fashionable in a lot of 17th and 18th century paintings to have a Black servant featured in portraits of very important historical figures from European History.

Honestly? They’re practically ubiquitous. A lot of the very famous paintings you’ve seen of European and American historical figures have a Black servant in them that have been cropped out or painted over.

Those silly stock photos from your American History Professor’s Powerpoint?

Your Professor’s PowerPoint for “George Washington”:

image

image

The actual painting:

image

image

Your professor’s Powerpoint on Jean Chardin:

image

The actual painting:

image

PowerPoint on Maria Henriette Stuart (with some commentary about the Habsburg jaw):

image

Actual Painting:

image

But, because of whitewashed history curricula, teachers and professors continue to use the cropped images because they don’t want their lecture to get “derailed” by a discussion about race.

These images are also more commonly seen on stock photo sites, including ones for academic use.

I honestly can’t find anyone really writing about this, or even any analysis on how often the cropped photos are used.

The reason they are so easy to crop out is because of the the artistic conventions which reflect the power hierarchy:

Oil paintings of aristocratic families from this period make the point clearly. Artists routinely positioned black people on the edges or at the rear of their canvasses, from where they gaze wonderingly at their masters and mistresses. In order to reveal a ‘hierarchy of power relationships’, they were often placed next to dogs and other domestic animals, with whom they shared, according to the art critic and novelist David Dabydeen, ‘more or less the same status’. Their humanity effaced, they exist in these pictures as solitary mutes, aesthetic foils to their owners’ economic fortunes.

This is drastically oversimplified, but at least it addresses it directly.

If anyone knows more on any studies or statistical evidence on this tendency, feel free to add it.

I just learned things.

i think about this a lot

My art history teacher told us about this black crusader who was considered a hero in Europe. He showed us some portraits of him, but after time Europeans began to portray him as a white man in artwork. He also showed us medieval paintings of free black men. He said people think there are no medieval paintings of black people, but there are and they just aren’t shown to or seen by many people.

I’m glad to hear that your teacher has been trying to incorporate this kind of material into the curriculum. That’s why I try to include as many educational links and resources as I can along with the images-even professional educators can have a hard time finding these artworks and info about them.

It’s also worth mentioning that part of why I focus on Europe-which is a subject of some valid criticism, considering how little time is usually spent on non-Western cultures in history related classes-is because what MUST be included in U.S. world history education by high schools and colleges is according to strict guidelines that are Eurocentric and/or Western-centric.

Educators  are often working under pretty strict conditions about what they HAVE to teach you. It’s my hope that by providing a lot of specific examples from eras and artists, professors and high school teachers will be able to make their powerpoints and handouts more representative of the people in the classroom and still stay within the dictates of their department or institution.

Ideally, world history and art history will become less Western and Euro-centric, but in the meantime while our history education remains the way it is, these materials can help show that history is more diverse than a lot of textbooks would lead you to believe.

heartbreakmonday:

Señor Love Daddy

heartbreakmonday:

Señor Love Daddy

paris2london:

(via Bruschetta Bar | What’s Gaby Cooking)