70sbestblackalbums:

September 16th 1970, Jimi Hendrix joined Eric Burdon on stage at Ronnie Scotts in London for what would become the guitarist’s last ever public appearance.
www.thisdayinmusic.com

70sbestblackalbums:

September 16th 1970, Jimi Hendrix joined Eric Burdon on stage at Ronnie Scotts in London for what would become the guitarist’s last ever public appearance.

www.thisdayinmusic.com

Damn is was tedious but my website is up. URBAN504.com. Even if you’re not an “artist”, tell your friends and family. Stuff to buy and stuff to see. 

Damn is was tedious but my website is up. URBAN504.com. Even if you’re not an “artist”, tell your friends and family. Stuff to buy and stuff to see. 

Today in NOLA

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

mrjynntastic:

one of my fav scenes to be honest, cause lawd knws if they allowed black folks in the league maaaaaaan listen, alot of what ifs possiblities 

This film, “A League of Their Own” dedicates so many scenes to issues like sexism.

Yet, blink too fast and you’ll miss this short scene…the one that shows how Black women were barred from the league.

The Black woman is supposed to represent Mamie “Peanut” Johnson (who actually did try out for the league). She wasn’t allowed to play and went on to be one of the few women to play with men in the Negro League. 

I WOULD LOVE TO SEE A FILM ABOUT JOHNSON AND THE OTHER WOMEN WHO PLAYED FOR THE NEGRO LEAGUE! But Hollywood …

uncle-tomfoolery:

Bloop

voguingfemme:

Ok so CBS it’s Rihanna’s fault she was beat up too?  How about you ban Chris Brown across all the networks and media you own.

Victim blaming.  Way to go CBS

dynamicafrica:

In honor of International Literacy Day, I compiled a list of some of my favourite books written by African authors (with the exception of the book about Fela). There are many books I could’ve added to this post but these were the first that came to mind.

There’s no order to this list and each comes highly recommended as they, in some way, changed me for the better. If I had to pick a favourite it would undoubtedly be Zimbabwean writer Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions simply because it was the first book I read in which I related so deeply to several of the characters - and still do. From Nyasha’s struggle with depression and being caught between two cultures she feels alienated by, to Tambu’s hunger for a world beyond her circumstances. Ugandan author Okot p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol comes in a close second, it’s just about as cheeky and blunt as I am in some parts and, perhaps a little out of narcissism, is why I enjoyed it.

Between these 18 books you’ll find everything from the personal to the political, and everything in-between. There’s love, there’s romance, there’s struggle, there’s strife, there’s beauty and there’s ugly too. No story is as simple as their titles may suggest, just read Camara Laye’s L’enfant Noir (The African Child) that explores the author’s early childhood in Guinea under French colonisation, or South African writer Sol Plaatjie’s historical novel Mhudi written in 1919 that placed a woman at the center of a story that deals with survival, displacement and early European colonisation in South Africa.

For anyone interested in reading these books, I found some of them available online (not all are complete):

dynamicafrica:

"Black man, you are on your own" - Steve Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977).

September 12th, marks the day South Africa anti-Apartheid activist and Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko was killed in police custody in Pretoria. Biko had been arrested a month earlier in Port Elizabeth where he had been detained and tortured, resulting in him falling into a coma.

Nearly dead and suffering a serious and untreated head injury, Biko was transported to Pretoria by car and died shortly after his arrival at the prison there. Police at the time would claim and broadcast to the world that Biko died due to a hunger strike but an autopsy and photographs taken of Biko postmortem, exposed with the help of journalists Donald Woods and Helen Zille, revealed that he had died as a result of the injuries he sustained whilst in police custody.

Today, nearly 40 years after his death at age 30, we remember a man that fought for an end to the brutality he and countless others suffered and still do today. The fight is far from over.

A luta continua!